The #1 Mistake in Marketing

January 23, 2019 Becky Schroeder


archery miss target
 

There is a ton of passion in this industry. I see it when I talk with people at conferences. I see it in our monthly profile series. (Which if you haven’t seen yet, you should check it out.)

Seeing this passion for the insurance industry makes it easy to forget that the average consumer doesn’t think about their insurance very often.

In fact, most consumers only care about their insurance policies at two specific times:

  1. At renewal time
  2. During a claims event

The #1 Mistake in Marketing

Insurance is a product we don’t want to buy but have to. Even for lines of business that aren’t mandated, like life insurance, the need we feel to buy those policies can be strong. It feels like part of our responsibility to have those policies in place.

Besides not wanting to buy it, we hope we never have to use it. And, because we don’t want to buy or use it, we shop on price.

Yes, most consumers are willing to pay a little more for better service and better coverage. But, it is usually about price. At least that’s what we as an industry often hear.

Even though consumers may say price is important, and they’ll shop their rates to save 15 percent or more, the decision to buy insurance is not fully based on logic. And, that is where you can get it wrong.

The biggest mistake you can make when marketing your agency is to assume people are rational. That they care as much about insurance as you do.

Don’t Rely on Logic

People do not make decisions only using logic. We choose products and services using our emotions in addition to logic. From the cars we buy, to the clothes we wear, or the soda we get at the gas station.

We make these choices based on how we feel when we buy them or on what we want other people to think about us.

The urgency we feel persuades us. And, social forces that are stronger than any logic play a part in our decisions. This is so ingrained in us that we don’t even realize we’re making decisions sometimes.

We may tell ourselves we are making a decision logically. But, logic is only the justification for what is an emotional decision.

Insurance is no different. It can especially be an emotional decision. Because we are choosing to protect what is most important to us.

When marketing your agency, don’t assume your audience will receive your message rationally.

More Effective Marketing

Your marketing will not be as effective as it could be if based on logic alone.

Instead, create your message and your campaigns to appeal to the logic AND the emotion. Focus on your why when marketing your insurance agency.

But, the most important thing you can do in your marketing is to not make it about you.

That may seem counterintuitive. But, remember. The people you’re trying to reach don’t care about you. They care about themselves.

So, tell your story, but make your clients the hero. That will appeal to both the logic and the emotion.

About the Author

Becky Schroeder

As senior vice president of sales and marketing, Becky Schroeder oversees ITC’s sales and marketing departments. Her specialties include creating and documenting processes; establishing metrics for managing those processes; developing content strategy and generating leads; and driving the overall company sales and marketing strategy. Becky was named an Elite Woman in Insurance by Insurance Business America in 2016. She has a master’s degree in integrated marketing communication from Emerson College in Boston and a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Texas A&M University. Becky is a big Texas A&M football fan and enjoys cooking, reading and spending time with her husband and their three daughters.

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